Dunning-Kruger Effect

​The Dunning-Kruger Effect named after David Dunning and Justin Kruger of Cornell University, occurs where people fail to adequately assess their level of competence — or specifically, their incompetence — at a task and thus consider themselves much more competent than everyone else. 

This lack of awareness is attributed to their lower level of competence robbing them of the ability to critically analyze their performance, leading to a significant overestimation of themselves. In simple words it’s “people who are too stupid to know how stupid they are”.

The inverse also applies: competent people tend to underestimate their ability compared to others; this is known as impostor syndrome. The principle is illustrated indirectly by the common saying that “I’ve learned enough about ________ to know what I don’t know.” The implication is that someone who hasn’t learned much about the subject would have no appreciation for how much there is to learn about it, and so might grossly overestimate their level of understanding.

If you have no doubts whatsoever about your competence, you could just be that damn good. On the other hand…

Using Classical Guitar Strings for the Baritone Ukulele

When I first started using the baritone ukulele I used strings specifically made for the baritone. Now I use classical guitar strings. I think they sound better. These are the steps I take.

D (4th String Position) – Install the A (5th) string from the classical guitar set.

G (3rd String Position) – Install the D (4th) string from the classical guitar set.

B (2nd String Position) – Install the B (2nd) string from the classical guitar set.

E (1rst String Position) – Install the E (1rst) string from the classical guitar set.

Starry Nights

“And when the universe has finished exploding all the stars will slow down, like a ball that has been thrown into the air, and they will come to a halt and they will all begin to fall towards the center of the universe again.

And then there will be nothing to stop us from seeing all the stars in the world because they will all be moving towards us, gradually faster and faster, and we will know that the world is going to end soon because when we look up into the sky at night there will be no darkness, just the blazing light of billions and billions of stars, all falling.”

― Mark Haddon, The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night Time

The Four Agreements

The following is a summary of “The Four Agreements” based on the writings of don Miguel Ruiz.

1. Be Impeccable with Your Word

Speak with integrity. Say only what you mean. Avoid using the word to speak against yourself or to gossip about others. Use the power of your word in the direction of truth and love.

2. Don’t Take Anything Personally

Nothing others do is because of you. What others say and do is a projection of their own thoughts and emotions. When you are immune to the opinions and actions of others, you won’t be the victim of needless suffering.

3. Don’t Make Assumptions

Find the courage to ask questions and to express what you really want. Communicate with others as clearly as you can to avoid misunderstandings, sadness, and drama. 

4. Always Do Your Best

Your best is going to change from moment to moment; it will be different when you are healthy as opposed to sick. Under any circumstance, simply do your best, and you will avoid self-judgment, self-abuse, and regret.